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Granite Bathroom Sink is Delicate Piece of Rock. You may Need a Professional for its Installation.

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If you choose a granite bathroom sink, there are a few things you may be interested to know about granite.

Granite is igneous, which means it was formed from fluid with grains of quartz and feldspar, which solidified slowly into hard rock. That is why it usually has a speckled appearance. Other minerals in it give it its colors. It can vary from quite light to almost pitch black.

This rock is what our earth is largely made of. Quartz and feldspar are harder than steel. Granite is very hard, and hard-wearing – a surface for a lifetime. Many other types of rock are often sold commercially as ‘granite’. If it has big grains and hard minerals, it may look like granite, but it may in fact be ‘gabbro’ or peridotite’, or even some other type of stone.

These may be very beautiful, but find out how durable it is first. They may have a percentage of limestone in them, which could be problematic. Limestone tends to etch, scratch and corrode when acidic substances are spilled on them. Some soaps and cosmetics on your granite bathroom sink may be acidic.

Caring for your Granite Bathroom Sink

The granite suppler will be able to give you instructions for your particular slab of granite. The differences in the composition of each piece of granite means that they need different kinds of treatment. You can choose a polished finish or a honed finish. Although honed finish is very beautiful, a polished surface may be easier to maintain.

Avoid leaving acidic substances for long periods on the surface, and never use harsh or abrasive cleaners. Use warm water and pH balanced dish washing liquid. Avoid scraping heavy objects across the surface, and should it be scratched or marked, use a little steel wool to rub the blemish away. Once a year, use a proper penetrating sealer, recommended by the dealer who sold you the slab, not an ordinary stone seal which will just clog up the surface. If something is dropped on your granite bathroom sink and you do get chips or cracks, you’ll have to get an expert in to invisibly mend the granite for you.

Tips for installing your Granite Bathroom Sink

Unless the bowl is also granite and part of the sink, you will have to install either an under mount sink or a drop in basin. In either event, the basin and the hole in the granite will have to match exactly.

Very few homeowners have the know-how or the tools to make the cut out in the slab themselves, so you will either have to buy the slab ready cut with the basin to match, or else you’ll have to go to an experienced stone-mason, taking the basin, and get him to do the job for you.

There is a difference of opinion about whether under mount sinks should be exactly the same size as the hole in the slab, or whether the sink should be larger. There are advantages and disadvantages to both. If the hole is smaller than the sink, it looks really good, but there is an awkward little lip under the slab to clean and keep free of mold and algae. If the sink is flush with the hole, it will be easier to keep clean, but the caulking will be visible from the top, which doesn’t look so nice.

It is generally advised to have a professional to install your granite bathroom sink, as it is heavy and special methods need to be used for silicone caulking and adhesives with granite. You will also need a really strong framework and brackets if it is not to be mounted on a cabinet. If you do decide to go it alone, here are a few tips for you:

• Make sure the granite is kept at room temperature for at least 4 hours before any work with adhesives.

• Clean the area of contact with alcohol and allow to dry thoroughly before applying silicone.

• If at all possible install your under mount sink first, before you install the granite slab.

• Use a temporary bracing frame to hold the under mount sink tight against the granite for at least 24 hours until the adhesive and silicone are properly cured.

Well it seems like a lot of research first, then a lot of hard work and also a lot of effort in keeping the granite looking good, but if it is really installed, there is nothing to beat a granite bathroom sink!

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